Dental implants have become a beneficial treatment modality in the replacement of missing teeth. Implantology has made significant strides in the United States and is presently the fastest growing area in dentistry. The number of implants placed in the United States should soon reach 300,000 annually. Bone grafting has increased in conjunction with dental implants. Bone grafting localized or regional dental ridge defects has contributed to expanding bone for dental implants.

The team approach for the management of the implant patient emphasized that the restoration drives the implant placement and any adjunctive grafting procedures. Crucial in the team approach to treatment planning is the evaluation of bone to get the best aesthetic and anchorage results. In the past, these two issues could be mutually exclusive, causing compromise in one or both areas.

In the team approach, the restorative dentist discusses what the prosthetic goals are and the surgeon describes what the surgical challenges are and what can be accomplished surgically. This sharing or cross pollination of ideas and options gives shape to the final treatment plan. But, this approach is not linear, where discussions only pass back and forth between doctors. It is a triangle where the patient’s desires and expectations are at the apex.

Dental implants are an exciting combination of biology and evolving technology. As the restorative and surgical armamentarium expands to improve our ability to deliver aesthetic and stable anchorage, the knowledge gained from research will help us to determine how we can continually improve our delivery of predictable results.

Implants and Dentures

A denture attached to dental implants is called an overdenture. There are several options on how you attach overdentures to the underlying implants.

In general an overdenture provides a very secure denture that improves stability and function while chewing. This new confidence of stability can enhance the lives of patients and increase their dietary range.

Bar Retained Overdenture

Bar Retained Overture
Bar Retained Overture

These photos demonstrate a bar retained overdenture. Yellow clips on the inside of the denture attach to the bar. Note the absence of a yellow clip in the center of the overdenture. There was one initially but the dentist had to remove it because it was so retentive the patient could not remove the overdenture with her own finger pressure…..The remaining retentive clips provided sufficient retention for patient satisfaction.

Bar Retained Overture
teeth

Snap-on retained mandibular overdenture

Snap-on retained mandibular overdenture
Snap-on retained mandibular overdenture

This is a snap-on retained mandibular overdenture. The small studs on the top of the individual implants attached to a retentive o-ring on the undersurface of the denture. Note the nice tissue response around the implants.

Snap-on retained Locator® mandibular overdenture

Snap-on retained Locator® mandibular overdenture
Snap-on retained Locator® mandibular overdenture

Here is another type of snap-on retained mandibular overdenture. These studs have the shape of a thimble that snaps onto an o-ring on the undersurface of the denture. Again note the nice pink gingivae tissue response around the lower implant.

Snap-on retained Locator® mandibular overdenture
Snap-on retained Locator® mandibular overdenture

Snap-on retained Maxillary Over-denture

Snap-on retained Maxillary Over-denture
Snap-on retained Maxillary Over-denture

This is a snap-on retained maxillary overdenture. Note that it is palate-less, no denture plastic covering the palate. There is no need for denture adhesive and food and drink can now touch the palate.

Snap-on retained Maxillary Over-denture
Snap-on retained Maxillary Over-denture

Oral hygiene is very important to keep the implants plaque free. Implants can’t get tooth decay (har har!), but can get gum disease if not kept clean.

Contact Dr. Berrios today!